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Russian Bikers are not Allowed to Ukraine

 Chernihiv Border Detachment did not passed through the state border of five Russian citizens on motorcycles. They took this decision on the results of checks at the checkpoint "Novy Yarilovichi", the press service of the State Border Service of Ukraine said.

"During the passage of the border control Russians were unable to confirm the purpose of their trip and staying in Ukraine, therefore, on the basis of paragraph 4 of Article 8 of the Law of Ukraine "On Border Control" they were denied entry," - said in a statement.

 
Posted by: , 2016-06-09 15:58:14 | comments

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Opposition leaders are not allowed at the Cabinet meeting...

Opposition leaders are not allowed at the Cabinet meeting  Opposition leaders are not Allowed to Government House  Opposition leaders are not Allowed to the Government House. According to UNIAN, leaders of the opposition parliamentary factions - "Svoboda" Oleg Tyagnibok, "UDAR" Vitali Klitschko and "Batkivschyna" Yatsenyuk - trying to get through the entrance along Sadova street to the Cabinet meeting, but they were not Allowed.  Then they came back to the place where the takes place rally in support of Ukraine's European integration, but the police do not let them either to one of the entrances.  Police blocked their mo..... Read more...

Lawyer Nikolai Polozov is not Allowed to Savchenko...

Lawyer Nikolai Polozov is not Allowed to Savchenko Lawyer of Ukrainian pilot, people's deputy of Ukraine Nadiya Savchenko Nikolai Polozov wrote on Twitter, that he was not Allowed to see his client. Read more on Novostimira: Ilya Novikov About Savchenko Health: Her ands are old and Heat Throughout the Body "Prison officer says that Russian doctors examine Nadiya,  a date will be Allowed up later. Me, then her sister Vira," - he said. Nikolai Polozov added that perhaps Savchenko is pumped  injections to visually look better. "Said to be Allowed in an hour," - said the lawyer. Recall that the Russian court..... Read more...

There are no Russian troops in the south-east of Ukraine - P...

There are no Russian troops in the south-east of Ukraine - PutinV.Putin once again renounced militants in eastern Ukraine.  There are no Russian troops in this. This was stated by Russian President Vladimir Putin, according to UNN.  "There are no military forces, no Russian instructors on the south-east of Ukraine", - assured reporters the Russian president.  On the question of whether the Russian Federation has intentions to join Ukraine or to destabilize the situation in the country, V. Putin said: "No, we had never do this, do not do and will not do this."  Source: UNN..... Read more...

Russian-speaking population of Ukraine does not need protect...

Russian-speaking population of Ukraine does not need protection, - S. Taruta There is no ethnic conflict in our Ukraine. And Russian-speaking people - they are not Russian, they do not need to be protected. This said chairman of the Donetsk Regional State Administration Serhiy Taruta at the opening of the YES summit, reports UNN. "We all want peace, but peace not at any price," - said Taruta. He also noted that the Russian-speaking population - it is not the Russian population. Source: UNN..... Read more...

Russian soldiers do not want to fight in Ukraine - journalis...

Russian soldiers do not want to fight in Ukraine - journalist  Russian journalist Dmitry Bavyrin wrote on his page on Facebook, that Russian military refuse to go to war in the Ukraine, and sometimes even resorted to desertion to avoid this. According to the journalist, the relevant information he received from a very reliable source.  "Sources (reliable) report that contractors who are sent to Ukraine, they were promised the dissmal by backdating of injury or death. In some units they collect things and go home. They are threatened by the court for desertion," - said in a statement.  Recall that, according to the Ukrainian a..... Read more...

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Putin does not mind handing over land in Kaliningrad exclave to Belarus, Lukashenka says

Alyaksandr Lukashenka told Russian journalists in Minsk on Friday that Russian President Vladimir Putin did not mind handing over idle land in the Kaliningrad exclave to Belarusian farmers....

Ukraine, Switzerland and the f-word

23.04.2014, 14:15 The future of Ukraine revolves around its very identity if not its borders member of the EU and NATO or part of the Russian Federation and its Eurasian association, with Crimea or without, with its eastern section intact or not. The future of Ukraine revolves around its very identity if not its borders member of the EU and NATO or part of the Russian Federation and its Eurasian association, with Crimea or without, with its eastern section intact or not. Another alternative, put forward by Moscow, would have Ukraine minus Crimea remain one entity ruled from Kiev as a loose confederation. But for the present government in Kiev as well as for most western leaders, federalism for Ukraine is a dirty f-word. ...

Ukraine and the Art of Creative Diplomacy

17.12.2013, 6:45 When most people think of diplomats, they think of aristocratic families and their descendants who attend private schools like Eton, Harrow or Le Rosey and universities like Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard or ENA. When most people think of diplomacy, they think of flying on special planes, feasting at fancy receptions in elegant embassies, sleeping in luxurious suites in hotels like the Hotel Intercontinental or savoring haute cuisine meals in restaurants like the Perle de Lac. One does not think of diplomats as being creative. However, there are situations in which creativity is needed to get out of seemingly intractable situations. The current crisis in Ukraine is an excellent example. A large country with over 40 million citizens, Ukraine appears torn between entering into a customs union with the Russian Federation and some former Soviet Republics and an accession agreement with the European Union (EU). President Viktor Yanukovich said he would sign the EU agreement in Vilnius at the end of November, then changed his mind and appeared in Russia negotiating with President Putin. No one, perhaps even Yanukovich, knows his intentions. At the same time protesters are in the streets of bitterly cold Kiev demanding Ukraines affiliation with the west, diplomats are calling for a round table discussion to find some non-violent way out of the tug-of war. As the basis of all good diplomacy in these type of situations is a win-win result, what could be a solution to the crisis? (Disclaimer: Although I was in Kiev last week, I was not involved in any of the negotiations.) Two historical examples come to mind. The first involves Switzerland, Russia and Georgia. The World Trade Organizations (WTO) acceptance of the Russian Federation as a member was the result of a creative diplomatic solution to the disputed border between Russia and its neighbors. The brief Russian-Georgian War of 2008 not only suspended diplomatic relations between the two countries but also caused international confusion about the definitive border between them. By recognizing the sovereignty of South Ossetia and Abkhazia in August 2008, the Russian Federation changed its border with Georgia. From the Georgian perspective, the border had not changed. The Working Party of the WTO on the accession of the Russian Federation was established in 1993. Admission to the WTO is done by unanimous approval, and the Russian Federation had significant difficulties convincing the other members of its eligibility during the entire 18 year process.  Finally, in 2012, with the help of Swiss diplomatic activity, a breakthrough took place which allowed all parties to accept Russias becoming a member of the WTO.  The Russian Federation and Georgia were able to agree on a border to deal with customs between the two countries while not agreeing on the definitive geopolitical border between them, a most creative diplomatic solution to the border question. The second example also involved borders, this time between Ecuador and Peru. Their dispute was the Western Hemispheres oldest conflict and the scene of numerous violent outbreaks. Since 1884, there had been at least 30 military confrontations, and as recently as January 1995, war broke out between the two countries that involved 5,000 troops and between 200 and 1,500 casualties. Finally an agreement was reached in October 1998 overseen by four Guarantor states. Whereas the agreement to allow Russia to join the WTO involved a customs border, the agreement between Ecuador and Peru involved a demilitarized ecological zone as well as a mutual security arrangement designed to prevent future conflicts and billions of dollars in financial assistance from major international institutions such as the World Bank. Neither Ecuador nor Peru was perceived to be losing territory in the arrangement. Both countries agreed to establish an ecological park on either side of the disputed border with free transit and no military forces allowed. The current crisis in Ukraine does not involve a specific border. It does, however, at least superficially, involve membership in two competing organizations. As the two examples above illustrate, there is the possibility for creative diplomacy to come to a win-win conclusion. Lets see how ingenious the diplomats can be if a win-lose situation is to be avoided....

Youre Either With Us or Against Us

19.11.2013, 12:15 George Bushs famous provocation that countries are either with us or against us in the war on terror stated a very clear binary position; there was no in-between. Much like being pregnant or dead, it was either yes or no. There are several decisions which will be taken soon about the future of Europe and what Europe means geographically that are taking on much of that binary yes or no. With the fall of the Berlin Wall, one had expected the division of Europe to have ended. As Mrs. Merkel recently said before a summit of European leaders, The Cold War should be over for everyone. Several former Soviet republics - Ukraine, Moldova, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Belarus have been invited to sign association agreements with the European Union. At the end of November, in a two-day meeting in Vilnius, decisions will be taken about whether these countries will move closer or not to the European Union. The alternative will be for the countries to join a nascent and expanding customs union with Russia that now includes Belarus and Kazakhstan. While Mrs. Merkel was certainly correct to declare that the Cold War should be over, tensions have risen concerning how each country will react. The Russian Federation has exerted considerable pressure, including cutting off energy supplies and embargoing certain goods. No troops have been involved we are, after all, post 1989 but the economic tensions are very clear and the sides to be chosen most explicit. Although quite different from the iron curtain descending across Europe in Winston Churchills memorable 1946 speech in Fulton, Missouri, it is clear that economic sides with political ramifications are being taken. An economic confrontation between the European Union and the Russian Federations custom union could be on the horizon. The dream of a united Europe, or at least a European security community proposed by Dmitri Medvedev, seems to be fading. The development of the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) in opposition to NATO is part of a developing curtain, not yet iron. Georgia and Ukraine are no longer realistic candidates to join NATO as promised in 2008. The European Unions eastern expansion is being called into question, if not grinding to a halt. The major country involved in the tug-of-war is Ukraine. Its president, Viktor Yanukovich, declares that he wants the country to move closer to Europe. And recent polls indicate that 45 percent of the population supports integration with Europe, 15 percent favors integration with Russia. However, the Ukrainian Parliament has just postponed a vote to allow the former prime minister, Yulia Tymoshenko, to leave prison for medical treatment abroad. The fate of this one individual has been a major concern for many European leaders who have insisted it is a necessary condition to move forward with Ukraines European agreement. So, concerning Ukraine, both internally and externally there is hesitation in the choice of sides.  Switzerland is a neutral country in the heart of Western Europe. It continues to negotiate its status with the European Union, but there is no question of its becoming a member in the near future. For some of the former Soviet republics, neutrality is a theoretical possibility but not a practical one. The upcoming Vilnius summit will be a deciding moment for the countries and Europe. Behind the economic talks geopolitical lines are being drawn, perhaps not solidified into iron, but nonetheless more solid than a mere plastic curtain....

Two Russian military servicemen to stand trial for recruiting prostitutes in Belarus

A criminal case against two Russian military servicemen who are accused of recruiting Belarusian women into prostitution has been sent to the Minsk District Court....

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The Birth of Nations: The Contrasting Cases of Kosovo and Crimea

14.03.2014, 12:00 The Birth of a Nation is a legendary 1915 American film directed by D.W. Griffith that became a classic because of its innovative film techniques. In spite of its extremely racist message, it was selected for preservation in the U.S. National Film Registry. The title of the movie raises difficult questions that are particularly relevant in Ukraine today: How are countries born? How do countries die?The deadlock in Ukraine has several layers of conflicting legitimacy narratives. The Russian Federation and their Ukrainian sympathizers maintain that the unfrocked Viktor Yanukovich is still the president of Ukraine until 2015, as the old laws stipulate. The West maintains that the parliament of Ukraine has removed him from power and selected others to lead until a new election this May under recently voted legislation. For the Russian followers, the Maidan demonstrations were a coup d?tat orchestrated with outside interference from the West. For the United States and Europe, the recent manifestations were democratic outpourings representing the true will of the people. The status of Crimea is part of the conflicting narratives. The Russian Federation justifies its intervention as a preservation of the safety of the Russian population living there. After all, the new Ukrainian parliament had voted to exclude Russian as an official language in the peninsula and Crimea was part of Russia until 1954. Just as the United States invaded Grenada in 1983 ostensibly to protect the safety of 800 students at the U.S.run St. Georges University School of Medicine, the Russians are claiming that their citizens and sympathizers are being threatened. If there happens to be a coup d?tat in the near future in Ukraine, we can be sure that the Russians will point to the American overthrow of the communist New Jewel Movement government in Grenada as a precedent as well as the historic Monroe Doctrine, which warns great powers to stay out of the Western Hemisphere. And if there is a referendum as planned on March 16, the Russians will certainly trumpet that a majority of the population wants Crimea to return to Russia. Just as in Abkhazia and South Ossetia, the Russians have been giving passports to sympathetic locals promising future benefits if the vote goes their way. If the vote goes the other way, they are threatening to cut off gas and oil. All of the above raises the fundamental question of the legitimacy of governments and countries. As Marcelo Kohen pertinently points out in Le Temps on March 13, the very same governments that are crying foul against the proposed referendum in Crimea are those who applauded the decision by the government of Kosovo to declare independence from Serbia. As Professor Kohen notes: If the unilateral declaration by the Parliament of Kosovo proclaiming secession from Serbia was not illicit, why is it so for that of the Parliament of Crimea from Ukraine? International law tries to be objective. But, finally, the existence of a country is based on political recognition, especially by major powers. Following Kosovos declaration of independence from Serbia in February 2008, 110 countries have given it diplomatic recognition. Following the Georgian War of August 2008, only six countries have recognized Abkhazia and South Ossetia as independent countries outside of Georgia. Whereas international law tries to be objective, countries often go above the law to achieve their desired ends. Those who go above the law, however, must be prepared to accept the consequences of their actions. The recognition of Kosovo by the major powers was a slap in the face to Serbia and its Russian backers. Although the West continues to maintain that that recognition did not set a precedent, the view from Moscow was and is quite different. For not only does international law try to be objective, it also tries to limit hypocrisy. ...

Two Homyel-based opposition activists arrested near Russian embassy in Minsk

Dzmitry Karashkow and Stanislaw Bula, opposition activists resident in Homyel, were arrested by police near the Russian embassy in Minsk on Tuesday for staging a protest against the invasion of Ukraine’s Crimea region by Russian troops....

2013 Huligan Bikers Club MFC , 쒿 7 . Huligan Bikers Club MFC 09.00 㳿 ̳ , - ....

[370] Lobodin photoshoot of India (PHOTO)

Opening of the photographs on the exotic India, the former singer of the group "Via Gra" (now a solo career, as well as walk on the path leading television) Svetlana Loboda was very impressive. The presentation was among the guests there were some well-known figures from the spheres of culture, television, pop music ... an exposition of the chosen one of the premises of the Ukrainian House, which was launched on October 18 the exhibition. About the exhibited photographs can say that they are perfectly executed, but as many photo correspondent with the experience and photocritic stole suspicion that the photos are not Svetlaniny. Already very high professional work. Even in Ukraine photographers and photojournalists who shoot at this level and with such a sophisticated vision of reality, very little. Many domestic and foreign photographers to achieve this level are decades of continuous practice. Ordinary tourists, who came on tour, many moments in the life of Indians may seem commonplace, and, as usual, they pass by his attention. Give a precise answer to the question whether these cadres removed, as demonstrated at the exhibition, indeed Svetlana Loboda or someone else, can only time. It is hoped that this photo exhibition is not the last, and it is followed by many more in which the ex-Via Gra "only confirmed what she did best, and be able to take their rightful place among the best photo artists in the world....

Very Cool and Getting Downright Cold: McFaul Resignation and U.S./Russian Relations

06.02.2014, 16:45 As the Winter Olympics appear before us, we in the West are being overwhelmed with stories of stray dogs being abandoned in Sochi, the sad plight of people who were forcibly removed from their homes, and warnings of eventual terrorist plots and numerous security threats from Caucasus insurgents. We are being blasted with a narrative clearly reminiscent of the Cold War. Referring to the region around Sochi, the International New York Times announced in a front page story just before the opening of the Games, For the first time in history, the Olympics are being held on the edge of a war zone And we have not even mentioned the gay rights protests that are being planned. The recent resignation of the United States Ambassador to Russia, Michael A. McFaul, is very much a part of a story that continues to paint a picture of declining relations between the United States and the Russian Federation. We seem to have come a long way, in a downward spiral, from the heady reset days of March 2009 when Secretary of State Clinton gave Foreign Minister Lavrov the famous mock red button in Geneva. Indeed, it was McFaul, in an earlier position, who spearheaded efforts to improve the relations through the reset idea. And now he is leaving, ostensibly to spend more time with his family in California, but well short of a normal tour of duty for an ambassador. Clearly, the former Stanford University professor, Russian expert on the National Security Council as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director of Russian and Eurasian Affairs, feels that his two years in Moscow have not been successful; the New Start nuclear arms control treaty being an exception. Where have the days gone when individuals like Georgy Arbatov could easily converse with W. Averill Harriman? Where are the days when experts at MGIMO and the USA/Canada Institute in Moscow were in constant communication with their American colleagues at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University and the Harriman Institute of Columbia University? Granted that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov seem to have a good working relationship; but is that enough? A critical mass of scholar/diplomats is evidently lacking, certainly on the American side. Is every up and coming scholar/diplomat too busy learning Arabic or Chinese instead of Russian? What does McFauls resignation mean for future U.S. scholar/diplomats? for U.S./Russian relations? Very shortly after his arrival, Ambassador McFaul began discussions with opposition leaders and civil society activists. He was quickly criticized by Russian officials for interfering in their internal affairs. It got so bad that he had to publicly deny that he was sent to Moscow to encourage revolution. Tensions between the two countries have led to several negative consequences: the eviction of the U.S. international development agency A.I.D.; a law banning the adoption of Russian children by American parents; Russian asylum for Edward Snowden; the canceling of an August summit between the two presidents; the snubbing of the Olympics by the American president and the inclusion of several prominent gay activists in the U.S. delegation. The list is indeed impressive. While we are not approaching a second Cold War with the frightening possibility of a real conflict like the Cuban Missile crisis, the cooling of relations between the two countries does not bode well for finding diplomatic solutions to the Syrian humanitarian catastrophe or the enlarging civil strife in Ukraine. And, for the moment, there seems no simple solution to stopping the downward spiral or warming the relationship. When the architect of the reset policy resigns, it is clearly not a positive signal....

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