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Yatsenyuk: Ukraine should remain a unitary and not turn into a feudal country

Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk believes that separatists in the east are trying to achieve not federalization of state and its feudalization. But the central government will not allow it. Ukraine was, is and will be a unitary, independent and sovereign. The Head of Government said at the meeting of the second All-Ukrainian "round table" of national unity in Kharkov.

"Ukraine should be a single unitary state with broad powers of regions and not to share small enclaves where every businessman will buy to itself local council, the local administration and have small Abkhazia, Ossetia and Transnistria in Ukraine", - said Arseniy Yatsenyuk.

According to him, if we allow that Ukraine is divided into small pieces, then lead them will not be alone Viktor Yanukovych, as it was before, but 27 of the same power and selfish people.

 
Posted by: , 2014-05-17 15:48:07 | comments

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The President congratulated all Ukrainians on Unification Da...

The President congratulated all Ukrainians on Unification Day President of Ukraine Poroshenko in an address to his compatriots on the occasion of the Day of Unification said that Ukraine will remain a unitary state with a single state language - Ukrainian. UNN reported, citing the press service of the head of state.  Read: On January 22 Ukraine celebrates Unification Day  "Right now, almost 100% of citizens support a unified country, and amazes that the majority of Ukrainians see it as a unitary, not a federal" - the president said in an address.  Petro Poroshenko stressed that for him the unity of the country and the nation ..... Read more...

Parliament should not go on summer vacation - Patskan...

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Poroshenko should lead the process of decentralization of po...

Poroshenko should lead the process of decentralization of power in Ukraine - Yatseniuk  President of Ukraine Poroshenko should lead the process of decentralization of power in the country, said the Prime Minister of Ukraine Yatsenyuk.  "With regard to the process of effective decentralization, I believe that the President of Ukraine should be the leader of the process. As a real decentralization should occur through amendments to the Constitution of Ukraine," - said Yatsenyuk, presenting the program of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine in the Verkhovna Rada on Thursday.  A. Yatsenyuk said that his political position remains unchanged: the elimination of regi..... Read more...

The Economic Development Ministry predicts a decrease in inf...

The Economic Development Ministry predicts a decrease in inflation Ministry of Economic Development and Trade of Ukraine believes that should not to fall into panic about inflation and rising prices in the country - further devaluation of the hryvnia will not be. At least, so says Economic Development Minister Pavel Sheremet, what and told reporters at a press conference. His position, he explained that the Ministry of Finance expects the effectiveness of containment measures of Cabinet of Ministers to reduce the budget deficit. "I as an economist expect not expanding, and the deterrent effect that should lead to the reduction of inflation," - sa..... Read more...

Russia is trying to turn off Ukraine from all energy sources...

Russia is trying to turn off Ukraine from all energy sources and cut gas transit to the EU - YatsenyukRussia wants Ukraine to turn off all energy resources. and knowing this, the Ukrainian side is now trying to maximize to pump gas in storage. This was announced at a meeting of the Cabinet of Prime Minister of Ukraine by Arseniy Yatsenyuk. "We know about Russia's plans to turn off Ukraine from all energy sources. The government now has accumulated in storage 15 billion cubic meters of gas, I recall that six months ago, there were 5. We are diversifying supplies of coal as mercenaries from Russian bombs and destroy the mines, where we produce thermal coal, "- said Yatsenyuk. Also, h..... Read more...

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